PYI YOGA PHILOSOPHY ONLINE

Teachers include:
New York City favorite & international teachers 
Manorma teaching the Yoga Sutras.
Jacob Kyle, MA teaching Samkhya Philosophy
Rob Lindsey teaching The Bhagavad Gita

These 3 low-homework courses can be done individually, or together.
Listen anytime, or join us live online! 
ALL the info below.

Great for yoga students & teachers alike.

PYI YOGA PHILOSOPHY ONLINE

Begins March 12th!
Required for PYI Yoga Therapy Certification
Continuing Education Units with Yoga Alliance
GREAT rate for you & and earlybird, too.  See below…

We are thrilled to be partnering with Embodied Philosophy to provide this online 50-hour training. World-class instructors walk students through the most vital texts and philosophies of the yoga tradition in this course which is required for PYI Yoga Therapy Certification and counts towards CE credits with Yoga Alliance.

Yoga Sutras of Patanjali

with Manorama D’Alvia 
March 12th – April 30th
Tuesdays, 7-9pm ET

This course offers a comprehensive investigation into the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, one of the seminal texts of the Yoga canon.

Samkhya Philosophy

with Jacob Kyle 
July 11th – August 1st
Thursdays, 7-9pm ET

This course offers a penetrating look into what is often referred to as the “metaphysical backdrop of classical yoga”. Understand Yoga’s philosophical foundations and how it is relevant to contemporary issues.

Bhagavad Gita

with Robert Lindsey
September 10th – October 29th
Tuesdays, 7-9pm ET

Dive deep into yoga philosophy in this foundational course on Hinduism’s most beloved text. Engaging with the Bhagavad Gita is a necessary adventure for everyone on the yogic path.

PYI Integration Hours

with Dana Slamp
May 9th, August 15th, & November 14th
Thursdays, 4-6pm

For Yoga Therapy Certificate candidates only, join Dana Slamp as she integrates the series material into the larger context of Prema Yoga Institute’s curriculum.

Each course includes:
4-8 Live, Interactive Zoom Sessions
4-8 Q&As
4-8 Downloadable Videos & MP3s
Course Readings
10-20 Yoga Alliance Cont. Ed. Credits
10-20 Embodied Philosophy Credits
Private Pop-Up Facebook Group

Tuition
$597 or 6 Payments of $104
Early Bird (before 2/19): One-Time Investment of $497, or 6 Monthly Payments of $91 

NOTE: Presence at the scheduled times is not required for participation, but is required for credit toward PYI Yoga Therapy Certification. 
For certificate candidates requesting an absence, please see the PYI Student Handbook.

REGISTER TODAY!

5 Yoga Tips to Transform Old Habits


Namaste Prema Peeps,
 
It’s the middle of January, deadly freezing, and a time when that New Year’s resolution starts to dissolve away – just when we need our tenacity the most!
I’m sharing advice from the philosophy of yoga below, along with some expert tips to follow your intention (funny, they sound a lot alike!)
 
Before scrolling, don’t forget:
 Prema Yoga Essentials Training starts February 1st! 
 -and- Prema students can waive the Yoga Therapy Certification Enrollment Fee – just get in your application in by January 30th.  It’s short and easy. 
5 Tips to Change Old Habits

1. Combat the Kapha Season
 
This is the kapha season – or “earth” season – in the Ayurvedic calendar.  At a time when you dearly want to stay inside, you’re meditative or contemplative practice will benefit. Take time to explore – especially in these days around the lunar eclipse. 
 
The downside is that the kapha season can bring us a little too low – there’s a tendency towards depression, weight gain, and inactivity.  Combat this by getting to class!  This is the one time of year where hot yoga (but not too hot) is truly therapeutic.  Vinyasa and Ashtanga are great choices as well – keep moving once a day, favor warm cooked foods, and get as much of sun as you can.
 
2. Replacement Therapy?  The Sutras Say it Works
 
Charles Duhigg, the author of “The Power of Habit,” recommends identifying the triggers to your old habit – which can be from time, location, people, emotion, or ritual.  Once you find your trigger, you can intercept your pattern by taking an entirely new one.  The Yoga Sutras state that: 
 
“2.33 When disturbed by negative thoughts, opposite (positive) ones should be thought of. This is Pratipaksha Bhavana.”
 
Next time you wanna reach for the cigarette, the phone, or the remote, try replacing that pattern with a positive one.  Of course, the Sutras concern themselves primarily with thought.  But as the thought always precedes the action (even if primal or subconscious), try to dig a little deeper into why you have been keeping that habit.  Leading to the next step…
 
3. Get to the Root Cause
 
As an actor, I was taught that absolutely everybody has an objective, even if that objective is subconscious, and that every action – however negative – has some positive reward.  Getting to the root cause is critical.  I recommend journaling – sitting down and just downloading any “whys” of your old habits on paper.  You can even burn this paper as a mental and ritualistic way of discarding your old reward system.  Then, circle back to step 2, asking yourself, How can I get that reward in a healthy way?
 
The Sutras also say that ignorance is the root of all suffering.  Use your inquiry of “why” to dig deeper for a more lasting result.
 
4. Find your Support System
 
Have you ever heard about the study that says that you’re only as healthy as your 5 closest friends?  Pay attention to whom you are spending your time with, and what you are up to.  It’s no surprise, I suppose, that a lot of my friends love yoga and fitness classes (we’re also rather fond of travel & wine – but everything in moderation!)  Yoga class, a yoga training, or a meditation group are a great way to meet like-minded people who support your new intention.
 
5. Plan to Fail…But Celebrate Anyway
 
Odds are that not every day of January is going to be full of love & light for you, with 100% clean eating, pure thoughts, depressant/stimulant free, and full of yoga & cardio classes.  Experts recommend cultivating a recovery plan for those not-so-stellar days.  My go-to plan is to schedule in my positive behavior, marking on my calendar when and where I will follow through with healthy habits (especially after a day that involved –say, half a cake & Hulu binging). Whether you manage your tasks with a calendar or a checklist, be sure your new habits are on it.
 
In a great article on resolutions, the New York Times highlighted that small celebrations are a successful way to support your change.  Celebrating is a form of reward and personal affirmation – and can be as simple as telling a friend about your success & taking in their compliments & support.  

The most effective everyday celebrations are emotional – give yourself a pat on the back every time you follow through with a good intention (or discard an old habit).  This is how we bring out the shy, new patterns, and say goodbye to the old routine.
Care to learn more about PYI? The Yoga Therapy Certification is now 850 hours – including Practicum.

An Interview with Dr. Shari Becker – Yoga for Positive Body Image

Dr. Shari Becker will be leading PYI’s specialty training, “Yoga for Positive Body Image” September 24-25, 2017 in Manhattan.  The class is part of Prema Yoga Institute’s offered Specialty Yoga Therapy Courses.

GREAT NEWS:  NYS Social Workers can receive 16 CEU’s for this course!  You can sign up for the class directly at Kula for Karma’s website. Enjoy the interview!
______________________________________________________________

DANA SLAMP: Hello Shari! I understand that you’ve been a clinical psychologist and practicing since 1998. Tell me about the realization you came to when you started practicing yoga.

SHARI BECKER: Hello, Dana! Your question addresses my favorite topic: the integration of traditional psychotherapy with the philosophy and teachings of yoga. About 3 years into my clinical practice, a yoga studio opened up in my area. I took my first class with Sheryl Edsall, and I was hooked! I could move my body in ways that didn’t require athleticism AND listen to her talk about spiritual concepts that resonated with me at the same time?? I’m in! In her words, through yoga, I found answers to some of the issues I had been struggling with in my own life. “Speak your truth and let go of the results” is an example of a life-changing comment she made during one class. “Live in faith, not in fear” is another. Once I started integrating the teachings and lessons I learned from my own practice into my life off the mat, I soon began to recognize specific ways in which this wisdom could help some of my patients with their struggles.

DS: Did you see some natural applications of yoga philosophy and techniques in the clinical setting? Or was it odd to consider at first?

SB: While the relevance of yoga philosophy in the clinical setting seemed quite apparent to me in a very natural way, I ran into two issues. The first was that my training, a traditional approach to clinical psychology, strongly discouraged therapists from “self-disclosing” or bringing their own experiences or beliefs into the therapy process. I was a fairly new therapist and still following the rules. Even mentioning that I had gone to yoga class that week was outside the structure of traditional psychological treatment. In addition, we were taught as psychologists the importance of empirical validation, or research to support our methodology. Yikes! I couldn’t find any research to support what I was doing. It was pretty scary to leave the tried and true approach that I had been trained in.

However, I recognized that with careful attention to the impact on my patient, I could responsibly introduce the subject of yoga and respectfully ask each patient individually, if the appropriate circumstances arose. I also jokingly told them they were free to call the “therapy police” on me if they were so inclined! Over time, my anxiety around breaking the rules lessened and I witnessed the successful application of yogic wisdom in facilitating happier and healthier lives for my patients. One of the first patients I introduced to yoga found a community that she desperately needed in the yoga studio and became a beautiful yoga teacher herself!

DS: Eating disorders are known to be very complicated diagnoses. What about yoga is useful in such a case?

SB: This is a great question, Dana, and the answers will be found in the upcoming Advanced Yoga Teacher Training for Disordered Eating and Negative Body Image. Yoga is an ideal adjunct modality to complement more traditional approaches to treating eating disorders. The training will draw upon many of the therapeutic qualities of yoga to inform yoga teachers and therapists about how they can promote healing, in a very deep and embodied way, for the eating disorder population.

Yoga offers us new perspectives, interrupts our habitual patterns of thinking, teaches us to recognize physiological signals, and invites us to slow down, reflect and pause before we move into action. In addition to addressing the specific needs of the diagnosed eating disorder population, our training will provide information and practical application of yoga philosophy and practice to those who struggle on a regular basis with sub-clinical disordered eating habits and negative body image.

DS: As yoga teachers, so many of us know students who are struggling with negative body image, and most of us have danced with that demon ourselves. It strikes me that in our image-saturated culture, it’s not really a fair fight. How can yoga help us reclaim our self love and worth?

SB: This question raises an important and provocative issue that evokes passionate response in many. Advertisements and messages about food consumption and body image prevail in our society. It is never easy to go against the flow of cultural norms, but no one ever said practicing yoga was easy! Many people have a misconception of yoga and believe it is a physical practice. In its fullest form, yoga invites us to explore our inner selves to get to know our mental, emotional, spiritual and relational bodies as well as our physical body. Once we are able to recognize that we are so much more than our physical bodies, we are able to disengage from the superficial values promoted by the media and other societal factions. From this safe position of boundary and clarity, we are free to cultivate love and compassion for ourselves.

DS: Our Kula for Karma friends have shared how giving you have been in supporting their efforts to bring yoga to at-risk communities and groups. Tell me about what drew you to serve with Kula as a teacher.

SB: Kula for Karma recognizes the therapeutic value of yoga and touches the lives of individuals who are greatly in need of healing, medically, emotionally and spiritually. The populations served by Kula reap the benefits that yoga offers, including stress and anxiety reduction, increased awareness of physical and emotional experience, and self-compassion.

Kula for Karma was founded in my NJ community 10 years ago by two incredible women, Geri Topfer and Penni Feiner, I knew Geri and Penni from our local yoga studios and was very interested in the work they were doing right from the start. Fortunately, Kula offers many opportunities for volunteering and involvement at every level of the organization, so I was able to support them for many years before I was certified as a yoga teacher. It has been a great source of pride and joy to watch my teenage sons join the Kula team by volunteering their IT skills at the annual gala.

DS: We’re so thrilled to now invite Social Workers into the program, and to provide them with 18 CE’s in New York – a huge feat! Other then just about every yoga teacher (IMO!), who else could benefit from this two-day intensive?

SB: I agree with you that every yoga teacher could benefit from understanding how to teach in a way that promotes non-judgment, self-compassion, non-competitiveness and a gentle approach in relationship to our bodies. I also believe that mental health professionals would gain a different perspective on the struggles their patients face in relation to food, eating and body image. Many, if not most, women in particular spend an enormous amount of time and energy believing there is something wrong with themselves, their bodies and their eating habits. The yogic approach to healing offers many profound lessons that would serve all of our patients well. It is sometimes easier to think about our patients as the ones with the issues, but this training will also help each participant become more self-reflective about their own personal dance with the thoughts and feelings that often stand in our way of a healthy and joyful experience in our own bodies. We can only teach what we know, and most of us are works in process on this topic of food, eating and body image. I am looking forward to sharing my own journey with the participants in this training.

Wait, the Point is Pleasure!? June Ayurveda Essentials

Quick: Can you name a calorie-free, addiction-free, just downright FREE daily pleasure that doesn’t involve another person? If an answer doesn’t come to you quickly, but a whole list of other crap does, then you may need a refresher course in the simpler things in life.

That’s how it was for me.  I was knee deep in my third career, and – even though I loved my job – my career, my friends, a handful of vacation days and whole lot of hustle were all I had.

When I burned out and searched for another way to live, I luckily found myself in an Ayurveda course. The first lesson was that Kama – or pleasure – is one of the primary reasons for life.

Not just something you do one day a week,
Not just something to distract you,
Not in a bottle,
Not in an invite,
And definitely NOT a diversion, but
Pleasure is the POINT of life.

Every day offers us a multitude of opportunities to be fed by beauty, healthy rituals, amazing food, and uplifting study and community.  Real energy lies in “pleasure refueling,” and finding these free sources of mojo can significantly cut down on the Starbucks bills!

As a teacher, the Ayurvedic lens saves me time and effort, and has made my yoga therapy work infinitely more precise, effective, and direct.  Imagine if you could determine what a person needs just by looking at them – isn’t that a skill you’d like to have, especially if you are in the healing arts?  And wouldn’t you love to empower your clients to nourish their health and happiness?

That’s why our June Prema Yoga Ayurvedic Training is both an essential life course and a required course for therapeutic teachers.

We study outside,
We indulge in the senses,
We seek to become better listeners,
Better teachers,
And better caretakers of our bodies and minds,
All through infinite sources of pleasure.